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Eberly 2017

2017 Eberly Distinguished Lectureship in Immunology

The Eberly Distinguished Lectureship in Immunology was established in 2011 by the Department of Immunology and the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute to recognize the generous support of the Robert E. Eberly Family and to showcase each year the research of three prominent international leaders in the field of immunology.

Drew M. Pardoll, MD, PhD, Abeloff Professor of Oncology and professor of medicine, of molecular biology and genetics, and of pathology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will be the next speaker in the 2017 Eberly Distinguished Lectureship in Immunology series. His talk, “Immunotherapy: Where It All Began, and Where It Is Going,” will be presented at noon on Thursday, May 11, in Lecture Room 6, Scaife Hall. Pardoll is director of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy and codirector of the Cancer Immunology and Hematopoiesis Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins.

 Pardoll is highly regarded for his seminal findings pertaining to new types of immune cells and regulatory mechanisms. He has deepened our understanding of the molecular aspects of dendritic cell biology and immune regulation, particularly related to the mechanisms that cancer cells employ to evade the immune system. His research has also facilitated the development of therapeutic antibodies against several targets, including LAG3. He has made fundamental advances in cellular immunology, including the discovery of gamma-delta T (gd-T) cells, natural killer T (NKT) cells, and interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDC). He elucidated the role of Stat3 signaling in tumor immune evasion and in Th17 development, leading to the discovery that Stat3-driven Th17 responses promote carcinogenesis. Pardoll discovered one of the two ligands for the PD-1 inhibitory receptor and leads the program that developed PD-1 pathway-targeted antibodies, demonstrating their clinical activity in multiple cancer types.

 Pardoll is an inventor of several immunotherapies, including GVAX cancer vaccines and Listeria monocytogenes-based cancer vaccines. His lab currently focuses on the regulation of antigen-specific T-cell responses and the study of approaches to modify these responses for immunotherapy.

 Pardoll earned his MD and PhD and completed his residency and oncology fellowship all at Johns Hopkins University before completing a fellowship at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH. His awards and honors include the Burroughs Wellcome Experimental Therapeutics Award and induction into the American Society for Clinical Investigation. 

 The Eberly Distinguished Lectureship in Immunology was established in 2011 by the Department of Immunology and the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute to recognize the generous support of the Robert E. Eberly Family and to showcase the research of prominent leaders in the field of immunology.